“The world’s first honey made with artificial intelligence”, thanks to the combined hives.

“There are two million bees here,” said Slomki Frankin as he entered a 12-square-meter white container in the middle of avocado fields in the northern Israeli Kibutz Bet Hemek.

The container called “Behom” may contain 24 hives, the 41-year-old beekeeper explains, wearing a hat with a veil to protect himself from possible stings.

The beehives act like ordinary wooden beehives, except that they are operated by a robot housed inside that monitors the insects, controls their habitat and provides them with care, says Shlomaki Frankin, who works at the bee company at the source of the mega hive. .

The robot can automatically deliver sugar, water, medicine. If there is a problem, it alerts the beekeeper through an application. The latter can interfere remotely from his computer

Arriving to inspect a control, he observes an electrical device that moves to the center of the buzzing box and pulls out a frame of honey so that the honey bees are clustered.

Solar energy

“The robot is equipped with sensors that allow it to know what’s going on in the frame,” explained Netali Harari, BVIS ‘director of operations.

“Thanks to artificial intelligence, our software knows what bees need,” he said at the workshop, where large metal hives are assembled.

The robot can automatically distribute sugar, water and medicine.

If there is a problem, it alerts the beekeeper through an application. The latter can intervene remotely from his computer and remove if necessary.


Large metal hives are assembled in a workshop.

Jack Guez / AFP

The mega hive, which runs on solar energy, can control temperature, eliminate nuisance and even extract honey, thanks to an integrated centrifuge, claims Netali Harari.

The start-up will produce honey for the first time since the end of May, “The world’s first honey made with artificial intelligence! Encourages the director.

Warned by the robot, the beekeeper could intervene remotely through his computer.


Warned by the robot, the beekeeper could intervene remotely through his computer.

Jack Guez / AFP

Europe in two years

For Shlomki Frankin, “the robot is a tool for beekeepers, but it does not replace it”.

“I can do a lot of simple things from a distance, such as stretching or squeezing the hive […] Or let the robot do it and focus on other tasks, “he said, adding that” it saves a lot of time. “

Bees have adapted to technology.


Bees have adapted to technology.

Jack Guez / AFP

One hundred of these robotic hives have already been deployed in Israel and a dozen in the United States. Beewise is looking to enter the European market in two years.

The start-up, created in April 2018, which has more than 100 employees, has invested around 76 million euros in export development.

Protective technology for endangered bees

According to Professor Sharoni Shafir, head of the Center for B. Studies at the Hebrew University of Rehobot, the technology could help protect the increasingly fragile bee colony.

“Sometimes it takes months for a beekeeper to realize a problem. With a robot, he can deal with the problem in real time, which reduces bee mortality,” he explains.

In recent years, many of them have disappeared around the world, suffering from “colony collapse syndrome”, which is responsible for a combination of different factors.

“As a result of construction, the loss of flower fields has reduced the source and variety of bee food,” the expert noted.

“In Israel, 20 to 30% of hives disappear every year”, but a large part of the human diet depends on pollination.

Added to this is Professor Shafi’s list of pesticide use, diseases and parasites such as the verruca destroyer, a destructive mite.

“In Israel, 20 to 30% of hives disappear every year”, however, “we rely on bees”, confirms entomologist who recalls that a significant portion of human food is pollinated, provided by insects that allow plants . Reproduction

The bee joins the attached hive.


The bee joins the attached hive.

Jack Guez / AFP

More than 80% of crops – almost all fruits, vegetables, oilseeds and protein grains, spices, coffee and cocoa – depend heavily on it.

“Bees and other pollinators are essential for food security and nutrition,” summarizes the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), which celebrates World Bee Day on May 20 to highlight the importance of their conservation.

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