The “reckless” of Philippe Mezesquez and the terrible child of Rue Rossini

In 2014, the story titled “Two Boys” revived the author’s passion for one of his fellow students at La Rochelle High School. It had a clear name: Harvey Guibert, the great writer of the future, whose work and destiny have nurtured an intense focus of admiration.

Breakup is followed by “reckless” …

In 2014, the story titled “Two Boys” revived the author’s passion for one of his fellow students at La Rochelle High School. It had a clear name: Harvey Guibert, the great writer of the future, whose work and destiny have nurtured an intense focus of admiration.

“L’Insouciance” took place in 1975, shortly after the break with Guibert. This time, the book qualifies as a novel. A young man of exceptional beauty, arrogant pale, blonde like an evil angel, plans to write about his great-aunts, already in a desperate friendship with the famous actress Isabel Adjani: the reader will not know the confusion about this. This “gay love” that pushes the narrator to leave Paris, inspiring in him a strong desire for a new life and motivates him to accept the unexpected invitation of a friendly curator, the director of the museum de Nice: “Come on, think this position is a Brackets, the start of a holiday or something, the sidewalk … “


The Villa Massena, a museum in Nice, whose narrator will share a few months of life, exhibitions and collections.

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His name was Milo

We say yes, and we find ourselves in a small shady room in the Palace Massena, sharing the life of a museum, its exhibits, its collections (but it fascinates a Carolus-Duran and a Van Donzen at the Cheret Museum), to be established with the master of the place, Ten years older, without any sexual ambiguity, creating a relationship is “a limitation with courtesy”. Without any ambiguity? The narrator is annoyed by the way his host leads him, happy to see the gossip, finds him a function à la Penelope Fillon, even arranges him for an annoying official party that Proteas secretly goes to flirt in Albert I Park.Of.

There may be ridiculous moments in this neoclassical “madness” of Promenade des Anglais. Beyond Giscard, the Queen of England appears on the porch, while Anne-Ayman is worried: so many people are pushing against the railing. Will he enjoy the fate of Marie-Antoinette in Versailles?

This novel is full of light and serious, “bright sadness” borrowed from the city of Nice

Two more places irresistibly attract the narrator. On the cornice, Villa Orlamonde where Maeterlinck lived, then a secluded ruin suitable for recovery, and at its foot, some rocks and an authentic, Coco-Beach. We see people naked there, we meet people there. The book begins: “I remember this boy from Nice, his name was Milo. A regular on this beach whose enlightened, mysterious, kind and pathetic personality haunts the story.

“Beautiful trio”

Describing a cat, a “flight expert”, he inherited the nomadic tendency from his parents. In Villa Massena, loneliness catches him. He met Paulina, Georges, and Gaspard, whom the curator quickly nicknamed the “excellent trio.” This is a group so low-key that the newcomer joins the roommate without difficulty, and Gaspard moves away and joins Rossini at 18. They are gay, spoiled, prankster, free, indifferent. Sometimes cruel (they play a vicious trick on Mr. O’Reilly, a former pastry chef who looks like Dame Tartin, and insults the “magicians”, these two gentle old gentlemen, a Bentley and a chauffeur who used to be with the young men one hour ago.) Type GHB). The trio is a happy adoptive family for our cats, where everyone comes and goes. Their mockery and disorder often reminds them of Cocteau’s horrible children.

This novel is full of light and serious, “bright melancholy” borrowed from the city of Nice. The most beautiful scene? The narrator’s grandmother sent him a taste of the graveyard. He is walking along the side of the castle hill in the Jewish cemetery. There is a tomb, less prudent than the others. Two concrete cubes and three small pictures. The face of a child, Silvio, who died in the early 1930s, and his two toys, a plane, a car. This is a Panhard & Levassor. So this indifferent young man, who likes Malher’s “Kinder Tottenleader”, sings “at the garage door” for the dead boy. By taking care to roll “r”, and pronouncing like Trenet: “Pannard”.

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